DNR confirms black bear report in southern Indiana PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Monday, 18 July 2016 13:45
The Indiana Department of Natural Resources today confirmed the presence of a black bear in and around Corydon in southern Indiana.
The bear was first reported around 9 p.m. Sunday. Indiana Conservation Officers received a call from a Harrison County homeowner of a bear going through the caller’s garbage.
Conservation officers, sheriff’s deputies and local animal control officers responded but did not locate a bear. On Monday morning, the bear was observed by several people, including conservation officers, in areas near State Road 62 and later in Corydon.
The sighting comes roughly a year after a black bear wandered into northwest Indiana from Michigan. That bear was the first verified presences of a bear in Indiana in more than 140 years. After spending several weeks in Indiana, the bear returned to Michigan. Young black bears are known to disperse in the springtime as they seek new territory in which to settle. The bear is most likely wild and swam across the Ohio River from Kentucky. Kentucky has an expanding bear population.
“We’ve anticipated this possibility and our staff has been preparing,” said Linnea Petercheff staff operations specialist with the DNR Division of Fish & Wildlife. Black bears are shy by nature and tend to avoid human contact. Attacks are rare. Black bears are non-aggressive in most instances and prefer fleeing from humans when given the chance. DNR wildlife biologists offer the following bear awareness tips:

– Don’t intentionally feed bears. If a bear becomes accustomed to finding food near your home, it may become a “problem” bear.
– Eliminate food attractants by placing garbage cans inside a garage or shed.
– Clean and store grills away after use.
– Don’t leave pet food outside overnight.
– Remove bird feeders and bird food from late March through November.
– Don’t add meat or sweets to a compost pile.
– If encountering a bear, don’t run. Shout, wave your arms and back away slowly.
– Collect and remove low-hanging or fallen fruit from fruit trees.

– Eliminate meat, cooking oil, fish or fruit odors from near your home. This includes fish-meal fertilizers.

– Collect and remove any ripened vegetables from your garden.

Indiana DNR encourages citizens to report bear sightings to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or by calling (812) 334-1137 during regular business hours. Photos or videos can be sent to the same email address. The maximum file size is 15 MB.
DNR wildlife biologists will monitor the bear to determine whether to allow it to remain where it is or trap it and relocate it to a more suitable environment for a bear. That decision will be based on whether the bear exhibits nuisance behavior and continues to come into close contact with humans.
The DNR has a protocol in place should the bear become a nuisance, according to Josh Griffin of the DNR Division of Fish & Wildlife.
“It’s best if people just leave the bear alone and let it be a part of the natural environment,” he said.
As European settlers began arriving in the 1700s in what is now Indiana, black bears were found throughout the territory. Loss of habitat and demand for furs of all sorts led to the bears’ demise in Indiana. According to the book “Mammals of Indiana” by John O. Whitaker, Jr., and Russell E. Mumford, the last confirmed report of a resident wild black bear in Indiana was in 1850. Whitaker and Mumford report a bear sighting in northwest Indiana in 1871 but note it was forced south from Michigan to escape a series of fires known historically as the Great Michigan Fire.
Black bears are now listed as an exotic mammal and protected under Indiana Administrative Code 312 9-3-18.5 (b-1), which prohibits the killing of a black bear except by a resident landowner or tenant while the animal is “destroying or causing substantial damage to property owned or leased by the landowner or tenant.”
South-central Indiana is hilly and heavily forested with large tracts of public land. Harrison-Crawford State Forest and O’Bannon Woods State Park occupy about 26,000 acres in the area. The Hoosier National Forest also occupies large swaths in Crawford and neighboring Perry County.
“It is possible black bears may re-establish populations in the southern half of our state,” said Sam Whiteleather of the DNR Division of Fish & Wildlife. “Education efforts on how to deal with nuisance black bears would be conducted to help ensure black bears are enjoyed from a distance.”
 
Body found near Deam Lake PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 13 July 2016 07:56

Media outlets in Metro Louisville reported Wednesday morning and the Clark County Sheriff's Department has confirmed that the body of a 58-year-old man was found Monday afternoon.

The body, that of John Theiss, was found near Deam Lake by a motorcyclist on a wooded trail near Persimmon Run Road Monday.

According to the Clark County Sheriff's Department preliminary findings point to a possible overdose, but that will not be determined until autopsy and toxicology results obtained.

The death is still under investigation.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 13 July 2016 08:40
 
Baptist Health signs binding purchase agreement for Floyd Memorial PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 13 July 2016 07:50

With the go-ahead from government officials and both hospital boards, Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services has moved one step closer to becoming part of the Baptist Health Family.

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Floyd County arrest list PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 13 July 2016 07:49

The following is the arrest list from Floyd County through the early morning hours of July 10.

In most cases those listed are just facing charges and have not been convicted of any crimes. They are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. 

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Baron Hill withdraws from U.S. Senate race PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 13 July 2016 07:48

Democratic nominee for U.S. Senate Baron Hill released the following statement to his supporters after withdrawing from the U.S. Senate race and removing his name from the November ballot:

STATEMENT FROM

BARON HILL

“I can’t thank you enough for your support over the last year and a half since I first announced my candidacy for the U.S. Senate. We have worked tirelessly to raise money and to build a grassroots network that would hopefully carry us to victory on Election Day. 

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